Arturo’s Brains: a short story

Arturo’s Brains: a short story
eBook: $2.99, free for Kindle Unlimited subscribers
Author:
Genre: Short Story
Length: short story
ASIN: B00796MNEO

Arturo was a desperate man.

When Erik approached him, Arturo saw the warning signs. An aura of violent colors around the man burned like the fires of Hell. Arturo should have known better.

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About the Book

Despite his powerful heritage that linked him to the Aztecs of Central Mexico, even the Anasazi of ancient New Mexico, Arturo was a desperate man. He hadn’t had paying work in months.

When Erik approached him, Arturo saw the warning signs. An aura of violent colors around the man burned like the fires of Hell.

But his want for food, drink, and warmth made him blind to the risk.

Erik rewarded him well, filling Arturo’s stomach in the warmth of his studio. Then he asked for Arturo to pose so that he could capture the essence of Arturo on canvas.

The results were far better than what Erik had hoped for. When he revealed his masterpiece to the world, he would become as famous as Arturo’s Brains.

From the Author

This story carries a theme I enjoy, that of the thin, often invisible lines between one thing and another — in this case, between art and crime, between reverence for one’s subject and disdain for it.I also enjoy the subtle parallels — the ancient trees taken from the homeland of Arturo’s youth and turned into low-quality stick-built houses, just as Arturo’s brains were taken for low-quality nitwit-built art.The Anasazi connection may seem contrived, but it’s not, at least not much. In my original draft of this story, I had Arturo be of Mayan descent. It seemed reasonable to switch that to Aztec (a culture that came after the Mayan culture, which collapsed around 900 A.D.), and there are many lines of suggestion (if little evidence) that the Aztec trace their original homeland of Aztlan, which many lines of evidence trace to the Anasazi in northwestern New Mexico. For one reference among many, see A History of the Ancient Southwest by archaeologist Stephen H. Lekson, p. 26.
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